halftheskymovement:

A new Afghan law would allow men to attack their wives, children and sisters without fear of judicial punishment under a change to Afghanistan’s criminal prosecution code that bans relatives of an accused person from testifying against them. Because most violence against women is within the family, the law, which passed parliament but awaits the signature of President Hamid Karzai, would effectively silence victims and most potential witnesses. 
Read more via The Guardian.

halftheskymovement:

A new Afghan law would allow men to attack their wives, children and sisters without fear of judicial punishment under a change to Afghanistan’s criminal prosecution code that bans relatives of an accused person from testifying against them. Because most violence against women is within the family, the law, which passed parliament but awaits the signature of President Hamid Karzai, would effectively silence victims and most potential witnesses. 

Read more via The Guardian.

(via global-activism-at-hart)

caraobrien:

The Trojan Paradox
…the global evidence is clear: If you want to reduce the number of abortions, making them illegal won’t work. Making modern contraceptives widely available is far more effective. And, as a not insignificant side effect, this is also a strategy that puts women more firmly in charge of their own bodies and health, saving tens of thousands from death and millions from illness each year.

caraobrien:

The Trojan Paradox

…the global evidence is clear: If you want to reduce the number of abortions, making them illegal won’t work. Making modern contraceptives widely available is far more effective. And, as a not insignificant side effect, this is also a strategy that puts women more firmly in charge of their own bodies and health, saving tens of thousands from death and millions from illness each year.

(via global-activism-at-hart)

The UN Declares Contraception Access To be a Universal Human Right

feminspire:

image

In a recent report, the United Nations have declared that access to contraception is a universal human right. This is on the basis that restricting women’s access to contraception – whether legally, financially or culturally preventing her – is an infringement of women’s rights. This report has no legal ramifications for national laws, though it does urge governments and leaders to reform their policies regarding contraception, family planning and abortion.

This follows the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in 1994, in which 179 countries signed a Programme of Action, allowing couples and individuals to “decide freely and responsibly the number and spacing of their children and to have the information and means to do so” – something the UN now hails as shifting the perception of governments and international organisations on family planning and population control.

While this seems like a natural progression, it’s a bold step that will be controversial among conservatives everywhere – but this report has endless potential to change things for the better for women across the globe…

Read more on Feminspire.com

(via global-activism-at-hart)

Survey of World's Poorest Children Reveal Telling Insights

annegoddard:

Children are very honest about what they see around them; they have an incredible gift for insight, even into the not-so-obvious. Read more in my HuffPost about our Small Voices, Big Dreams survey.

(via global-activism-at-hart)

halftheskymovement:

"Investing in girls’ education and health has positive economic impacts for girls themselves, for society and for the next generation. If all students in low income countries left school with basic reading skills, poverty would fall by 12%."
Learn more via UNICEF.

halftheskymovement:

"Investing in girls’ education and health has positive economic impacts for girls themselves, for society and for the next generation. If all students in low income countries left school with basic reading skills, poverty would fall by 12%."

Learn more via UNICEF.

(via global-activism-at-hart)

vicemag:

The Glue-Sniffing Street Kids of Somaliland
On an ordinary night, after the sun sets over Hargeisa, Somaliland, Mohamed packs up his shoe-shine kit and heads to the storm drain where he lives when he’s not working. All things considered, it’s a good spot for the 12-year-old to sleep—the discarded snack wrappers and plastic bottles help keep him warm, and when the sun creeps in each morning the shadow of a nearby skyscraper shields him from the heat.
The skyscraper, which was built in 2012 and houses a company whose business is to bring high-speed internet from neighboring Djibouti, is one of the many symbols of Hargeisa’s relative wealth. The city itself is the crown jewel of Somaliland, a self-declared republic in northwest Somalia.
Although Somaliland’s sovereignty has yet to be formally recognized by any other country or the UN, it has its own democratically elected government and a 30,000-strong military. Its nascent borders contain valuable natural resources—the Turkish oil company Genel plans to drill for oil there in the next two years—and the bustling northern port city of Berbera, which are two good reasons Somalia doesn’t want the region to secede. The government in the terror-torn capital, Mogadishu may also be clinging to the hope that Somaliland’s peace and prosperity could spill over into the rest of the region. But whatever the contours of this convoluted political landscape, at the very least Somaliland feels like a separate nation; houses in Hargeisa fly the tricolored flag the region adopted in 1996 instead of Somalia’s sky-blue standard.
Continue

vicemag:

The Glue-Sniffing Street Kids of Somaliland

On an ordinary night, after the sun sets over Hargeisa, Somaliland, Mohamed packs up his shoe-shine kit and heads to the storm drain where he lives when he’s not working. All things considered, it’s a good spot for the 12-year-old to sleep—the discarded snack wrappers and plastic bottles help keep him warm, and when the sun creeps in each morning the shadow of a nearby skyscraper shields him from the heat.

The skyscraper, which was built in 2012 and houses a company whose business is to bring high-speed internet from neighboring Djibouti, is one of the many symbols of Hargeisa’s relative wealth. The city itself is the crown jewel of Somaliland, a self-declared republic in northwest Somalia.

Although Somaliland’s sovereignty has yet to be formally recognized by any other country or the UN, it has its own democratically elected government and a 30,000-strong military. Its nascent borders contain valuable natural resources—the Turkish oil company Genel plans to drill for oil there in the next two years—and the bustling northern port city of Berbera, which are two good reasons Somalia doesn’t want the region to secede. The government in the terror-torn capital, Mogadishu may also be clinging to the hope that Somaliland’s peace and prosperity could spill over into the rest of the region. But whatever the contours of this convoluted political landscape, at the very least Somaliland feels like a separate nation; houses in Hargeisa fly the tricolored flag the region adopted in 1996 instead of Somalia’s sky-blue standard.

Continue

(via global-activism-at-hart)

womenrockscience:

apersnicketylemon:

nothatsstupid:

hayleystarkftw:

(source)

Makes me want to fucking cry

But feminism isn’t important and is something none of us should care about. Right?

Wow, I love it when people use science to bust inequalities. We’ve got a long way to go.

(via global-activism-at-hart)

amnestyusa:

A sad map: LGBT rights across Africa. And it’s only been getting worse lately. Help us do something about it! First up is stopping the Anti-Homosexuality Bill on the table right now in Uganda. TAKE ACTION » 

amnestyusa:

A sad map: LGBT rights across Africa

And it’s only been getting worse lately. Help us do something about it! First up is stopping the Anti-Homosexuality Bill on the table right now in Uganda. TAKE ACTION » 

(via global-activism-at-hart)

dirtydirtychai:

kickass-hetalia:

beautifulsnk:

flomation:

PLEASE READ THIS POST

See this statue? It’s located at the Glendale Central Library. 
Big deal right? Yes. Yes it is. 

She stands here today as a memorial for the victims of the sexual slavery and abuse committed by the Japanese imperial military during WWII. Right now, Japan is running a petition to take her down.

We cannot let this happen.

Every Wednesday, the women of Korea that were used as sexual slaves protest and cry out. However, Japan refuses to acknowledge their suffering. There have been no apologies and no recognition.

Please, please don’t let them get rid of her. Their pain deserves to be recognized and sympathized.

Luckily, There is a petition going on to save the girl and allow her to continue standing in Glendale CL. The link can be found here and you can read more about everything that she stands for here.  

Thank you so much for reading this. Even if you can’t sign this, please signal boost so other people will. 

[[A big thank you to tumblr user did-we-just-marry-thedevil for bringing this to my attention]]

If this statue is taken down, we are erasing the memories and pain of the thousands of Korean (and Chinese) sex slaves during WWII. As a Korean female myself, this is even more disheartening.

Please signal boost.

REBLOG

"The news that the statue was installed made a big noise in Japan," Nishida said, as it describes the women as sex slaves. "That hurts Japan’s honor."

Glendale erected the roughly $30,000 statue, which was paid for by Korean groups, in July, and a wave of controversy followed. City officials received thousands of letters from Japanese nationals and Japanese Americans opposing the statue.

Fuck every single person opposing this statue, and Mio Sugita, Yuzuru Nishida,and Hiromu Nakamaru  in particular. 

It hurts Japan’s honor???? FUCKING SERIOUSLY??? What about the up to two hundred thousand women across Asia who were forced into sexual slavery, what of their honor??? What of my 이모할머니, stolen away as a young woman, who survived and wrote to tell her family as such but refused to let them know her location or ever see them again from her shame? Who my great-grandparents were never able to locate, whose grave we can never visit? 

I have just had fucking enough of Japan’s- I DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT TO CALL IT. WORDS AREN’T STRONG ENOUGH. 

I mean, here you have Osaka Mayor Toru Hashimoto saying that women who were forced to serve as sex slaves for Japanese troops during World War II were necessary.

""When bullets are flying like rain and wind, the soldiers are running around at the risk of losing their lives. If you want them to have a rest in such a situation, a comfort women system is necessary," Hashimoto said. "Anyone can understand that." "

How do you have in the same statement a Japanese official saying “his historical research has revealed that the Japanese Imperial Army was not the only one to use sex slaves.” (MEANING THAT THEY DID INDEED USE SEX SLAVES) and then with the same breath say “there is no proof that the women were abducted and forced into sexual slavery.”

YOUR LOGIC IS FAULTY, JAPAN. 

AND THEN, FUCKING THIS. “[He] added it is “problematic” that Japan is being viewed negatively due to what he called “propaganda” by Korea and other countries.”

(Ahahaha and then there’s this gem: Last month, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe seemed to question whether Japan was the aggressor during the war, saying the definition of “invasion” was relative.)

It’s not like Japanese soldiers haven’t admitted to the atrocities, or that there isn’t documented evidence since Japan kept obsessive records of everything, 

Ugh. I’m so pissed off I’m shaking. 

I’ll just end with this quote from peaceshannon: 

"Finally, I want to say of the estimated 200,000 women who were forced to work as sex slaves in “comfort stations” during WWII, approximately 150,000 were Korean women but only 234 South Korean registered officially as survivors.

Of those 234, only 63 are still living. Japan must resolve this issue, but they are literally hoping that the issue will die away with the Halmonis.”

 

(via global-activism-at-hart)

thefeministme:

An Amazing Campaign in India called “Abused Goddesses” showing the contradiction of worshiping female goddesses in religion but having unsafe conditions for women, like domestic violence.
Via: Women’s Rights News

thefeministme:

An Amazing Campaign in India called “Abused Goddesses” showing the contradiction of worshiping female goddesses in religion but having unsafe conditions for women, like domestic violence.

Via: Women’s Rights News

(via global-activism-at-hart)

unconsumption:


Did you know that you can make houses out of plastic bottles? By filling them with sand, and molding them together with mud or cement, the walls created are actually bullet proof, fire proof, and will maintain an comfortable indoor temperature of 64 degrees in the summer time.
And it’s not like there is any shortage on used plastic bottles out there. Here are some statistics from treehugger.com:
“The United States uses 129.6 Million plastic bottles per day which is 47.3 Billion plastic bottles per year. About 80% of those plastic bottles end up in a landfill!”
To build a two bedroom, 1200 square foot home, it takes about 14,000 bottles.
The United States throws away enough plastic bottles to build 9257 of these 2 bedroom houses per day! That’s just over 3.35 million homes, the same number of homeless people in America.

(via America Could End Homelessness in One Year by Doing This - The Mind Unleashed)

unconsumption:

Did you know that you can make houses out of plastic bottles? By filling them with sand, and molding them together with mud or cement, the walls created are actually bullet proof, fire proof, and will maintain an comfortable indoor temperature of 64 degrees in the summer time.

And it’s not like there is any shortage on used plastic bottles out there. Here are some statistics from treehugger.com:

“The United States uses 129.6 Million plastic bottles per day which is 47.3 Billion plastic bottles per year. About 80% of those plastic bottles end up in a landfill!”

To build a two bedroom, 1200 square foot home, it takes about 14,000 bottles.

The United States throws away enough plastic bottles to build 9257 of these 2 bedroom houses per day! That’s just over 3.35 million homes, the same number of homeless people in America.

(via America Could End Homelessness in One Year by Doing This - The Mind Unleashed)

(via global-activism-at-hart)

fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.
Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.
It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 
The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.
You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.

(via edwardspoonhands)

IN THEATERS NOW

madeinafreeworld:

image

"Why would I have a son, if not to work him?"

Needing more income, Siddhu’s father sends him to work in a trolley factory—but he never returns home. “Siddharth” shows one father’s relentless search for his missing son, while telling the larger, tragic story of how children in India end up enslaved as forced laborers and sex workers. 

FIND OUT if there are showings near you!