truststrut:

Paris Fashion Week street style at its finest #fashion #pfw #streetstyle

truststrut:

Paris Fashion Week street style at its finest #fashion #pfw #streetstyle

(via truststrut)

house-of-gnar:

Khoisan of Southern Africa 

Collectively known as the Khoisan (and other pejorative, questionable terms), these indigenous people of southern Africa represent dozens of individual ethnic groups and are one of a handful of extant population clusters that gave rise to all currently living Homo sapiens. They have some of the oldest and most frequently occuring Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial haplogroups of all Homo sapiens and are widely considered to be the first anatomically modern humans as well as the most genetically diverse (two other indigenous African populations can arguably make this claim). 

Genetic mapping of the region they inhabit (mainly Angola, Namibia, and Bostwana) suggests that some of the individual ethnic groups have been in the region for tens of thousands of years. They are some of the last posessors of the clicking languages as well as one of the last societies to survive as hunter-gatherers

read more about the Khoisan and their struggle to keep their lands and way of life. Read more about Khoisan genetics here .

(via whats-out-there)

sixpenceee:

The Krubera Cave is the world’s deepest cave. It is 2197 meters deep and will take you approximately an entire month to get to the bottom. Here is a map of this place. 

sixpenceee:

The Krubera Cave is the world’s deepest cave. It is 2197 meters deep and will take you approximately an entire month to get to the bottom. Here is a map of this place. 

(via travelthisworld)

rhamphotheca:

Bird Droppings Led to U.S. Possession of Newly Protected Pacific Islands
A 19th-century quest for natural fertilizer, bird guano, led to the world’s largest marine reserve.
by Dan Vergano
Blame it on “guano mania.” A craze for natural fertilizer made from bird droppings spurred the U.S. to take possession of a group of remote Pacific islands in the 19th century, and now those islands are home to the world’s largest marine reserve.
On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced an expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument to cover nearly 490,000 square miles, six times larger than its previous size.
(See “U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California.”)
The Guano Islands Act of 1856 made it possible. The United States long ago used the act to claim islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean as territory, which means that today the U.S. government has the legal authority to protect waters up to 200 miles out from each island, an area known as the exclusive economic zone…
(read more: National Geographic)
photograph: Tui De Roi/National Geographic

rhamphotheca:

Bird Droppings Led to U.S. Possession of Newly Protected Pacific Islands

A 19th-century quest for natural fertilizer, bird guano, led to the world’s largest marine reserve.

by Dan Vergano

Blame it on “guano mania.” A craze for natural fertilizer made from bird droppings spurred the U.S. to take possession of a group of remote Pacific islands in the 19th century, and now those islands are home to the world’s largest marine reserve.

On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced an expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument to cover nearly 490,000 square miles, six times larger than its previous size.

(See “U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California.”)

The Guano Islands Act of 1856 made it possible. The United States long ago used the act to claim islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean as territory, which means that today the U.S. government has the legal authority to protect waters up to 200 miles out from each island, an area known as the exclusive economic zone…

(read more: National Geographic)

photograph: Tui De Roi/National Geographic

TAKE ACTION Alert: Stop the Pebble Mine

Tell Northern Dynasty to Quit the Pebble Mine!
A Canadian mining company — Northern Dynasty Minerals — is the last one standing behind the Pebble Mine, which threatens to destroy Alaska’s spectacular Bristol Bay wilderness, its world-class salmon runs and a way of life for Native communities. Tell that company’s CEO to quit this reckless and disastrous venture.

(Source: rhamphotheca)

feiyueshoesusa:

Wudang Tai Chi Kids!

Professional Tai Chi online shop offer you the best tai chi uniforms and tai chi and tai chi swords.

http://www.icnbuys.com/tai-chi-clothing-uniform

Reblog, INSTANT FOLLOW BACK!

(Source: taichishop)

morethanphotography:

Concentration by pick_chon

morethanphotography:

Concentration by pick_chon

travelstoke:

In the beautiful #garden fronting magnificent Culzean #Castle, #Ayrshire, #Scotland by davidmbyrnedotcom http://bit.ly/1qJU9bP

travelstoke:

In the beautiful #garden fronting magnificent Culzean #Castle, #Ayrshire, #Scotland by davidmbyrnedotcom http://bit.ly/1qJU9bP

mapsontheweb:

Gun Restrictions by Country

cheezefish: Colors are based on which quintile said country falls into on the list provided by the source.
Federations may have different laws depending on states or subdivisions. This is especially true for the US. In this map, the most lenient state laws represent the entire country.
Data

mapsontheweb:

Gun Restrictions by Country

cheezefish: Colors are based on which quintile said country falls into on the list provided by the source.

Federations may have different laws depending on states or subdivisions. This is especially true for the US. In this map, the most lenient state laws represent the entire country.

Data

travelstoke:

Double Trouble. @srilanka #wildlife Langa Monkeys, Wilpattu National Park. by gregorsnell http://bit.ly/XGVRno

travelstoke:

Double Trouble. @srilanka #wildlife Langa Monkeys, Wilpattu National Park. by gregorsnell http://bit.ly/XGVRno

rolandiatravel:

Romanian Architecture - House with Lions, Constanta

rolandiatravel:

Romanian Architecture - House with Lions, Constanta

(via butourwinter)

oxfamgb:

We can tell you that the situation in South Sudan is desperate, but there’s nothing like seeing it for yourself. We asked one mum living in a camp to wear a camera – she was happy to do it because she wants the world to see what her life has become.

Watch the footage below and if you believe in what she says at the end, please SHARE it.