crisisgroup:

Thai junta aims to restart Muslim south dialogue
More than a year after previous talks stalled due to Thailand’s political crisis, the military has announced it will attempt to restart a peace dialogue with insurgents in the country’s Muslim-majority south demanding political autonomy.
The bitter conflict, rooted in historical distrust between Malay Muslims and Thai Buddhists, has killed over 6,000 people and injured around 10,800 since January 2004.
National Security Council Secretary-General Thawil Pliensri declared over the weekend that the talks with southern rebels would reconvene before the end of this month, in agreement with the junta.
The dialogue was initially started in March 2013 by then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s civilian government, but was suspended last December as massive anti-government protests paralyzed the capital.
Since the May 22 coup, the junta has installed a series of reforms aimed at bringing together the two quarrelling factions - Red Shirts (opponents of the military and bureaucratic establishment) and Yellow Shirts (ardent royalists opposed to the governments of Yingluck and elder brother former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra) protesters - before new elections are held in October next year.
It now appears to be turning its attentions to the south.
FULL ARTICLE (World Bulletin)
Photo: Thomas Wanhoff/flickr

crisisgroup:

Thai junta aims to restart Muslim south dialogue

More than a year after previous talks stalled due to Thailand’s political crisis, the military has announced it will attempt to restart a peace dialogue with insurgents in the country’s Muslim-majority south demanding political autonomy.

The bitter conflict, rooted in historical distrust between Malay Muslims and Thai Buddhists, has killed over 6,000 people and injured around 10,800 since January 2004.

National Security Council Secretary-General Thawil Pliensri declared over the weekend that the talks with southern rebels would reconvene before the end of this month, in agreement with the junta.

The dialogue was initially started in March 2013 by then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra’s civilian government, but was suspended last December as massive anti-government protests paralyzed the capital.

Since the May 22 coup, the junta has installed a series of reforms aimed at bringing together the two quarrelling factions - Red Shirts (opponents of the military and bureaucratic establishment) and Yellow Shirts (ardent royalists opposed to the governments of Yingluck and elder brother former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra) protesters - before new elections are held in October next year.

It now appears to be turning its attentions to the south.

FULL ARTICLE (World Bulletin)

Photo: Thomas Wanhoff/flickr

Poverty has been rebranded as personal failure

sharonkelley22:

This is the way Australia is headed. We now blame people who are unwell, or have a disability as personal failures for not finding work - and ‘bludgers’ for claiming the disability support pension.

Demonising people with disability - particularly in situations where there are very few jobs - even for those without disability - does not progress anything other than a ‘blame-the-disabled’ mentality.

We fail, again and again, to realise that employers in Australia, including the Federal Government as an employer, the private sector and all those not-for-profit organisations that ‘use’ people with disability as unpaid volunteers, regards people with disability as ‘incapable’, and not worth either employing or being paid for the legitimate work they do.

We fail, again and again, to provide flexible working options for those with disability, to empower them to take control of their finances and their careers.

Share this link, and this post. Raise awareness of the insidious and appalling way we are failing for the disability community.

We have started a teleworking site for people with disability to provide work options. We are looking for employers to change this alarming demonisation by signing on to our web site and posting jobs for people with disability.

Enabled Employoment. Run and owned by people with disability, for people with disability.

"In the era of corporate globalization, poverty is a crime, and protesting against further impoverishment is terrorism"

Arundhati Roy, from An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire

(Source: thehomosuperior)

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Fire in the Mountains
Photo by Harvey Jewett (Spokane Valley, WA, USA); Hot Springs, MT, USA

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Fire in the Mountains

Photo by Harvey Jewett (Spokane Valley, WA, USA); Hot Springs, MT, USA

(via nprfreshair)

travelstoke:

Umbrellas provide shade over one of the avenues in the Kale İçi part of #Antalya. 
#summer #vacation #travel #travelstoke #hearttravel #Turkey by hallo_its_alex http://bit.ly/1oJm8Hr

travelstoke:

Umbrellas provide shade over one of the avenues in the Kale İçi part of #Antalya.
#summer #vacation #travel #travelstoke #hearttravel #Turkey by hallo_its_alex http://bit.ly/1oJm8Hr

archiemcphee:

For an ongoing series entitled The Great Travelling Art Exhibition, English artist Ben Long uses his bare hands to create elaborate drawings in the grime that accumulates on the rear shutters of haulage trucks. As the trucks transport their goods across town and country, Long’s artwork is shared with the public. That is, until time or the inevitable powerwasher obscures the image.

"The ongoing project aims to bring art to the public through these moving canvases, away from restricted space of museums and art institution—his artworks focus on subjects relatable to many, such as animal portraits, human and their pets."

Visit Ben Long’s website to check out more of his artwork.

[via Whudat and Design Taxi]

yahoonewsphotos:

The plight of the poor amid Philippines’ growing population

The Philippines has one of the fastest growing populations in Southeast Asia with around 100 million people. At least 12 million people live in the capital city of Manila alone, making it one of the most densely populated and largest cities in the world. Lack of space and economic opportunities has pushed around four million people to live informally along waterways, bridges and even cemeteries further straining the already weak infrastructure and straining the resources of the city.

(Photos by Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images)

See more from the Philippines and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!

fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.

In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.

The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.

The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.

In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 

(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 

abcworldnews:

A new report finds child poverty rates are on the rise: abcn.ws/1p88u1w

abcworldnews:

A new report finds child poverty rates are on the rise: abcn.ws/1p88u1w

genopp:

Bono’s got it right.

genopp:

Bono’s got it right.

"Undernourished girls become undernourished mothers who give birth to the next generation of undernourished children."

UNFPA’s Frederika Meijer on the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition that plagues girls and women. Read more.

(Source: newsecuritybeat)


Humans of New York
"Being disabled in America is like living in a third world country."


"Being disabled in America is like living in a third world country."

(via socialismartnature)